Edit

Bobux's Four Step Guide to Fitting Your Child's Shoes Correctly

September 13, 2015 No comments
Bobux's Four Step Guide to Fitting Your Child's Shoes Correctly

Calling all parents! We’ve created a useful resource for correctly fitting all your kids’ shoes. And we’ve condensed it into 4 – yes, just 4 – simple steps!

Some experts have turned buying kids’ shoes into an arduous process, a migraine-inducing quagmire of little details that inch you a few steps closer to insanity. We know fitting your squirmy, growing kids with the right shoes can be hard. But it doesn’t have to be complex. So we’ve put our foot down and brought you 4 too-simple steps to fitting your kids with the right shoes.


4 step guide to fitting child shoes

1. Measure your child’s feet

There are many ways to measure your child’s feet. If you have the money you can invest in a size gauge – those nifty foot measuring devices you see in shoe shops – and save yourself some hassle.

Otherwise, an effective shoe size guide is to place your child’s foot on a bit of A4 paper. Push their heel up against a wall and sketch around the foot as best you can.

Sorry guys, but we highly recommend measuring both feet as nearly all children (and adults too) have differently sized feet. It’s also worth measuring your child’s foot towards the end of the day and for your little bub to wear socks during this process. After all, they’ll likely be wearing them with whatever shoes you end up getting.

2. Leave some wiggle room

At Bobux, we like to say that if you want to see a clown, go to the circus. Your kid has a hard enough time learning to walk without stumbling, falling over or slipping out of their shoes.

Overall, we say that a thumb’s width worth of room at the toe end provides the perfect amount of wiggle room to give your child’s feet room to breathe and grow without swamping their foot.

This can be a tricky balance and if you’re not sure, just ask. Like any relationship, communication is key so check with your child about how comfy they feel in their shoes.

3. Weigh up the shoe’s material and design.

When it comes to researching types of shoes, it’s about more than their fit. Comfort, safety and flexibility can all be ticked off by doing a bit of research on your desired shoes: look at what they’re made of, how they’re made and how malleable they are.

As a general rule, canvas and leather shoes are much more appealing than their rubber or plastic cousins. Evidence shows kids’ shoes should be breathable and flexible to support growing feet.

The soles should also be flexible. A supple rubber sole is a good bet because they grip well, meaning your little one won’t fear slipping over.

Once upon a time, a shoe that ticked these boxes would be ugly as sin. But luckily, style doesn’t need to be sacrificed anymore. Kids’ shoes can be both comfortable and stylish.

4. Keep tabs on growth

Finally, it’s about paying close attention to your child’s growth. Kids often grow in spurts, which means that one year they might be able to make do with one pair of shoes, yet the next they’ll be going through two or three pairs.

It may sound obvious but this is a good time to evaluate your kid’s sock sizes as well. All your hard work finding them a perfectly fitting shoe can be undone with constricting socks that can interfere with healthy foot development.

Because of this unpredictable growth pattern, it’s a great idea to do a thumb test every few weeks to check there’s still a bit of room left at the end of your kids’ shoes. When the thumb’s width gap becomes a little finger-width, it’s time to go hunting for a new pair of shoes and at this point, the four-step cycle begins anew.

And we know just the place to start searching for your kid’s next pair of shoes. Here at Bobux, our award-winning, innovative shoes might be just what you’re looking for. Check out our quality range of shoes today and find a pair that will nurture your child’s growth and look good too!

Posted in: Foot Health
Sam Taylors By Sam Taylors

Social Media Manager at Bobux

Author's Facebook Profile
Author's Twitter Profile